Six Mile Cypress Slough Preserve

How do you pronounce “slough?” It rhymes with flew, not cough or chow. English is weird. Anyway, welcome to one of my favorite local spots! I will say, I prefer this place in the summer on weekdays because in the winter and on weekends it gets crazy busy. Today was a federal holiday, and I think everybody and their sister decided it was a good day for a walk at Six Mile Cypress.

The boardwalk isn’t particularly wide, so sometimes it’s best to step as close to the right as you can and allow people to pass. I do this often because I’m slooow when I’m looking for cool stuff to take photos of. I somehow managed to miss taking a photo of the portion of the boardwalk that only has rails on one side, probably because it was very peopley and I was trying to not fall in.

One bird you’re pretty much guaranteed to see here is the White Ibis. There are plenty of bugs and crustaceans here for them to eat.

Double-crested Cormorants are also almost always found here. They like to hang out on the platforms in the lake, until an alligator comes along and scares them away. Even then, a few brave souls stick around and hang out with the gators.

These herons were way across the lake, hence the awful photos, a little blue heron and three tri-colored herons.

It was pretty chilly today, so the snakes and alligators were hiding. There were lots of turtles though, and this one alligator that was trying to soak up some sun as it peeked out from behind the clouds.

Even when the wildlife is hiding from the cold, there’s always something amazing to see here. It’s only about one and a quarter miles long, but if you’re in the area, it’s worth a visit!

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